Monthly Archives

December 2016

Somatic Therapy_Art

The Healing Powers of Somatic Experiencing

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by Dianne Shelton

Somatic Experiencing (SE) is a form of healing designed to relieve and resolve the symptoms of post-traumatic stress injury and other mental, physical and spiritual trauma-related health challenges by focusing on the client’s real and perceived body sensations. These sensations are known as somatic experiences. The SE approach releases traumatic shock (physical and/or relational), which is essential to transforming disease and the wounds of emotional trauma by working with the nervous system. SE has become recognized as a compassionate healing model, as it does not require the traumatized person to retell or relive the traumatic event. Instead, the focus is on sensations rather than the story of the trauma.

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Sleep_Art

Prioritizing Sleep for Health and Well-Being

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by Bruce Wayne Meleski

Too many American adults accept poor sleep as part of modern life, which has transformed the way we sleep. Artificial lights allow us to work 24/7. There are the stressors of urban living and sedentary jobs that make it difficult to relax and expend the energy necessary to sleep efficiently.

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Austin Kung Fu Master Applies Unique Background to Teaching

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by Sheila Julson

Joe Schaefer, Ph.D. and founder of Austin Kung Fu, was a rising star in the science field during the 1990s. As a doctorate candidate in neurophysiology at the University of Texas – Austin, he was awarded Young Researcher of the Year in 1996 and had penned articles published in the Journal of Neuroscience. Yet he walked away from it to follow his long-time passion—sharing the physical and mental benefits of kung fu and tai chi with others.

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Learning to Focus and Concentrate

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Human brains are highly attuned to any blip on our sensory radar because that’s what ensured our survival. An area called the locus coeruleus is especially responsible for churning out neurotransmitters to the limbic system that tell the brain how to respond to stimuli and whether or not it’s supposed to be calm or on high alert. Even memories of events can trigger this physical stress response in our bodies.

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